Amy Whitehead's Research

the ecological musings of a conservation biologist

Wildlife Wednesday: Kōwhai

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Kowhai flower

The kōwhai (Sophora spp.) is a New Zealand tree legume that typically grows in open areas and along the edge of streams and lakes.   The name kōwhai comes from the Māori word for yellow – a reference to their prolific flowers and small pea-like seeds.  One of NZ’s most iconic plants, they flower from July to November and are an important source of nectar for native birds, particularly tui and bellbirds.  They are a common garden plant and most children I know spent time trying to get the seeds to grow by throwing them in boiling water or attacking them with sandpaper (okay I may have grown up in a strange neighbourhood but these are actually the best techniques for breaking the tough outer coating of the seed to get them to grow).   However, almost all parts of the tree are poisonous to humans, so don’t be tempted to take a nibble!

While New Zealand doesn’t have an official national flower, kōwhai would do pretty well in a floral showdown.  Indeed, kōwhai flowers are one of only two plants to make it onto New Zealand coins, featuring on the New Zealand 2c coin from 1967 to 1990 (the other being the silver fern on the 1c and $1 coins).  They also featured on a 3D (as in threepence, not three-dimensional) stamp released in 1960 and the 2.5c stamp when NZ converted to decimal currency in 1967.  Apparently they have also been immortalised in folksong, although I think this may have been popular a little before my time.

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4 thoughts on “Wildlife Wednesday: Kōwhai

  1. Great photos on your blog! We would love to have you as an author on our blog wildlifehub (wildlifepic.wordpress.com). Please check out our about page for more information and email wildlifehub@yahoo.com

  2. Pingback: Recent Qaecologist blog posts (July 2013) | The Quantitative & Applied Ecology Group

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