Amy Whitehead's Research

the ecological musings of a conservation biologist

Wildlife Wednesday: Tomtit

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The tomtit (Petroica macrocephala) is a small passerine bird in the Australasian robin family (Petroicidae). Also known as miromiro, or historically the great-headed titmouse, tomtits are endemic to New Zealand. Weighing in at only 11 grams, tomtits are one of the smaller species of New Zealand birds (the lightweight record goes to the rifleman at a mere 6 grams). But what they lack in size they make up for in character. They are common throughout New Zealand and live in shrubby and forested areas, where they typically perch on a branch or tree trunk to watch for flying insects. Once spotted, they will flit out and snatch up the target before resting on the next perching spot. You can often attract a tomtit into photographing range by imitating their call and then stirring up the leaf litter to disturb insects into the air. As kids we used to imitate bird calls by rubbing a piece of polystyrene on a wet glass jar and would be rewarded with tomtits perching on our packs or boots while they scanned the air for insects.

Tomtits have played a special role in one of New Zealand’s conservation success stories, acting as surrogate parents for a number of critically endangered Chatham Island black robin chicks. Black robin numbers dropped to just five individuals in 1980 due to predation by introduced mammals. With only one female (Old Blue) remaining, a dedicated team of conservationists devised a cunning plan to rescue the species by eliciting the help of the humble tomtit. Each year the team would remove the first clutch of eggs from Old Blue’s nest and place them in a tomtit nest. The unsuspecting tomtits raised the chicks and Old Blue would lay a second clutch of eggs. This cross-fostering was so successful that some of the first fostered chicks grew up thinking they were tomtits! Some careful tinkering with the techniques produced robins that thought they were robins and there are now ~250 black robins on two islands in the Chatham Islands.  All thanks to Don Merton and his team of dedicated conservationists and tomtits!

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One thought on “Wildlife Wednesday: Tomtit

  1. Pingback: 34 things in photos – October | Listful thinking

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