Amy Whitehead's Research

the ecological musings of a conservation biologist

Wildlife photography

I’ve been documenting my ecological journey by posting a regular Wildlife Wednesday photograph. Click on the images below to learn a little more about some of the critters that I have met along the way.

Nesting Adélie penguins

Nesting Adélie penguins

Adélie penguin

Adélie penguin

Antarctica

Antarctica

Tomtit

Tomtit

Feral pigeon

Feral pigeon

Dobsonfly
Dobsonfly

Kowhai

Kowhai

Monarch butterfly

Monarch butterfly

Ants

Ants

Black-fronted tern

Black-fronted tern

Praying mantis

Praying mantis

Echidna

Echidna

Bilby & friends

Bilby & friends

Western spotted frog

Western spotted frog

Whio ducklings

Whio ducklings

Mount Cook Buttercup

Mount Cook Buttercup

Damselfly

Damselfly

Yellow-billed spoonbill

Yellow-billed spoonbill

Kakapo

Kakapo

Comb Jelly

Comb Jelly

Tuatara

Tuatara

Kookaburra

Kookaburra

Orca

Orca

Leopard seal

Leopard seal

Crabeater seal

Crabeater seal

Weddell seal

Weddell seal

Skua

Skua

Adélie penguin

Adélie penguin

Whio

Whio

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6 thoughts on “Wildlife photography

  1. Pingback: Wildlife Wednesday: Whio ducklings | Amy Whitehead's Research

  2. Great photos Amy. Thought your website excellent. Keep the good work up.

  3. Just happened by…I began scrolling down, and was hooked! A+ for interesting and provocative.
    From 1978 to 1989 I worked in NY, NY (Manhattan). I moved about there alot, daily, managing real property. With a degree in Biology, and lots of family photos showing my crouching to see flora & fauna (aged 4-sib until adult), I have the eyes to see and follow wildlife. Your Feral pigeon post caused me to be reminded that in all those years, amidst the brick, mortar, steel, glass & asphalt of NYNY, with all of the time spent on rooftops, assaying their state and meeting roofers…I have never seen a single feral pigeon nest, egg or chick?
    How can this be?
    Jeff Zablow
    wingedbeauty.com

    • Thanks Jeff. That’s an interesting thought. I’ve never noticed them either, although I often see bits of straw under bridges and other places that pigeons seem to congregate, so presumably they are nesting up there among the bridge struts and on ledges. Rock pigeons nest on rock ledges on cliff faces, so I guess buildings provide similar habitat. Pigeon chicks must be fully feathered when they fledge, so we probably don’t notice them among the rest of the flock around our feet. I’ll have to keep an eye out in the future…

  4. Pingback: 34 things | Listful thinking

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